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Syndication

Episode 44: A Clockwork Orange (1971)

"Goodness is something to be chosen.  When a man cannot choose he ceases to be a man."

Stanley Kubrick dropped his plans for making an epic biopic about the life of Napoleon Bonaparte to make Clockwork Orange (1971), based on the novel by Anthony Burgess.  Today it remains one of Kubrick's most infamous films, with images rarely seen in popular cinema, but nevertheless stunned critics and audiences alike with its artful prose and cinematography that has since become a Kubrick trademark.

Although it was popular (snagging Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Film Editing), the film had its fair share of controversy, and until Kubrick's death had a self-imposed ban in the United Kingdom.  Today it is held up as one of the greatest works of 1970's cinema, and for obvious reasons.

Have a comment or question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com, follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC, and look for the podcast's Facebook page.

Direct download: Episode_44_A_Clockwork_Orange_1971.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm CST

Episode 43: Vampyr (1932)

"Accounts from many ages and lands tell of terrible demons called vampires.  Under the bright light of the full moon, they rise from their graves to suck the blood of children and young adults and thus prolong their shadowy existence."

Just after Dracula (1931) haunted American theaters, a Danish filmmaker named Carl Theodor Dreyer was testing the waters of European horror with Vampyr (1932), a simple tale with a paradoxical hallucinogenic plot that some argue topped Dreyer's previous masterpiece, The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928).

Vampyr is the story of a girl who is bitten by the titular monster and her family's efforts to cure her of the resulting disease, but it is told in such a way that viewers are challenged to figure out if what they are seeing is actually part of the plot, or a fever dream on the part of the protagonist.  Watching it is an experience not to be forgotten, and second viewings can be even better; even if one were to criticize its simplistic story, it still stands alone 84 years later as a bizarre work of art and an outstanding early contribution to the horror genre.

Have a comment or a question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com, follow him on Twitter @1001MoviesPC, and look for the podcast's Facebook page.

Direct download: Episode_43_Vampyr_1932.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm CST

Episode 42: Le samourai (1967)

"He's a lone wolf."

"He's a wounded wolf; now there will be a trail.  He must be disposed of quickly."

French director Jean-Pierre Melville may not be known to modern audiences, but in France in the 1960's he was a true popular and independent filmmaker, two things that could paradoxically spell success for a director at that time and place.

"Le samourai" (1967) features nary a samurai (nor anything else Japanese, for that matter).  It's about a hitman named Jef who finds himself the target of a client after completing a job for him.  A thriller with obvious neorealist influences, it's a tight portrait of a lonely professional with bare necessities...and a twist ending!

Have a question or comment for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com, follow him on Twitter @1001MoviesPC, and look for the podcast's Facebook page.

Direct download: Episode_42_Le_samourai_1967.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm CST

Episode 41: To Be or Not to Be (1942)

"The named a brandy after Napoleon, they made a herring out of Bismarck, and the Fuhrer is going to end up as a piece of cheese!"

Ernst Lubitsch was one of Hollywood's biggest imports in the 1930's and 1940's, directing comedies starring Hollywood names like Ninotchka (1939) with Greta Garbo and The Shop Around the Corner (1940) with James Stewart.  He titillated the censors with films about sex...without scripts that hardly mentioned sex at all?

As Europe became embroiled in World War II, Lubitsch made To Be or Not to Be (1942), a film that would poke fun at another taboo: Adolf Hitler.  Audiences and critics at the time hated it, but through the years it's become Lubitsch's most popular film, earning cult status with a script filled with innuendos and dark humor and fantastic performances by Jack Benny and Carole Lombard.

Have a question or comment for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com, follow him on Twitter @1001MoviesPC, and look for the podcast's Facebook page.

Direct download: Episode_41_To_Be_or_Not_to_Be_1942.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00pm CST

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