The 1001 Movies Podcast

If you see one Bollywood film in your life, it should probably be Mahboob Khan's Mother India (1957) a harrowing tale of the struggles of an Indian woman from her marriage to a doomed fieldworker to her disappointment in her two grown sons.

One critic called the film India's answer to Gone with the Wind (1939), and this pretty much hits the mark.  Mother India is exemplary of Mahboob Khan's work, featuring a female protagonist who defeats the odds (both financial and familial) to make it to the top.  A Technicolor masterpiece, the film unfortunately is rarely seen today except by classic Bollywood fans.

Have a comment or question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_74_Mother_India_1957.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CST

Wanda (1970) is the first and last feature film written and directed by Barbara Loden, whose only other claim to fame was that she was married to Hollywood director Elia Kazan.  Her name probably would have been eliminated altogether into obscurity if a group of French filmmakers and critics didn't revive her film after her death in 1980.

Loden made the film as a sort of feminist anti-Bonnie and Clyde, but it was probably the way it was made (with a realist approach and intentional graininess) that probably appealed to its French fans.  Had Loden not later succumbed to cancer ten years later, there's a very good possibility that she would have enjoyed her revival and made more films.

Have a comment or question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_73_Wanda_1970.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CST

No Man's Land (2001) is the first film directed by Danis Tanovic, whose first exposure to filmmaking was as a documentarian during the conflict that broke apart Yugoslavia.  As much a commentary as it is a dark comedy, the film drips with Tanovic's sardonic view of the war he witnessed.

When a Serbian soldier and a Bosnian soldier find themselves trapped in a trench in the middle of the battlefield (the titular "no man's land"), they find themselves pawns in an agenda between the UN and the media that does not end well.  The film's promotional material marketed it as a commentary, but you won't be smiling when the credits roll at the end.

Have a question or comment for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_72_No_Mans_Land_2001.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CST

Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall had already starred together in Howard Hawks' To Have and To Have Not (1944), but it was when Hawks reunited them in The Big Sleep (1946) that their onscreen chemistry really popped.

While the script is as confusing as Raymond Chandler's novel of the same name, Philip Marlowe is the epitome of the hard-boiled detective, an archetype that's been copied and parodied every since.  The real star of the film may be the witty dialogue between Bogart and Bacall, some of which went over the heads of those enforcing Hollywood's strict Production Code.

Have a question or comment for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_71_The_Big_Sleep_1946.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CST

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