The 1001 Movies Podcast

The second in Roberto Rossellini's "War Trilogy", Paisan (1946) is one of the first examples of Italian neorealism.  Split into six separate segments (or chapters), each written by a different screenwriter, the film tells the stories of the Italians and Americans in the final days of World War II.  Laced with tragic irony as well as bit of comic wit, the film is probably Rossellini's most popular films of the 1940's after Rome Open City (1945).

Have a comment or a question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com or contact him on Twitter at @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_78_Paisan_1946.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CST

Director Bernardo Bertolucci stopped post-production work on The Spider's Stratagem (1970) to direct The Conformist (1970), a bizarre tale of an undercover fascist assassin in Italy in the years shortly before the resignation of Mussolini.  Perfectly crafted, the film is one of Bertolucci's less enigmatic movies, which does not mean that it doesn't inspire the viewer to pause and think about what he has just seen.

Have a comment or question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com or contact him on Twitter at @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_77_The_Conformist_1970.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CST

In the 1930's Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers were Hollywood royalty, and it was a privilege for young director George Stevens to direct them in Swing Time (1936).  Although Astaire and Rogers would make many films together, this one remains a fan favorite, sporting several musical numbers which were carefully and skillfully choreographed by Fred Astaire, who built patterns with the music and dance steps from one number to the next.

Have a comment or a question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com or contact him on Twitter at @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_76_Swing_Time_1936.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CST

One of the first comedies produced by the prestigious Ealing Studios of London, Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) is an exercise in cynicism as well as a bright spot in the early careers of Dennis Price and Alec Guinness.  The film was the pinnacle in the career of director Robert Hamer, an Ealing regular, and also marked the beginning of the career of cinematographer Douglas Slocombe, who would go on to film a number of Hollywood blockbusters.

Have a comment or question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_75_Kind_Hearts_and_Coronets_1949.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CST

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