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Syndication

In the 1930's Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers were Hollywood royalty, and it was a privilege for young director George Stevens to direct them in Swing Time (1936).  Although Astaire and Rogers would make many films together, this one remains a fan favorite, sporting several musical numbers which were carefully and skillfully choreographed by Fred Astaire, who built patterns with the music and dance steps from one number to the next.

Have a comment or a question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com or contact him on Twitter at @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_76_Swing_Time_1936.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CDT

One of the first comedies produced by the prestigious Ealing Studios of London, Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) is an exercise in cynicism as well as a bright spot in the early careers of Dennis Price and Alec Guinness.  The film was the pinnacle in the career of director Robert Hamer, an Ealing regular, and also marked the beginning of the career of cinematographer Douglas Slocombe, who would go on to film a number of Hollywood blockbusters.

Have a comment or question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_75_Kind_Hearts_and_Coronets_1949.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CDT

If you see one Bollywood film in your life, it should probably be Mahboob Khan's Mother India (1957) a harrowing tale of the struggles of an Indian woman from her marriage to a doomed fieldworker to her disappointment in her two grown sons.

One critic called the film India's answer to Gone with the Wind (1939), and this pretty much hits the mark.  Mother India is exemplary of Mahboob Khan's work, featuring a female protagonist who defeats the odds (both financial and familial) to make it to the top.  A Technicolor masterpiece, the film unfortunately is rarely seen today except by classic Bollywood fans.

Have a comment or question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_74_Mother_India_1957.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CDT

Wanda (1970) is the first and last feature film written and directed by Barbara Loden, whose only other claim to fame was that she was married to Hollywood director Elia Kazan.  Her name probably would have been eliminated altogether into obscurity if a group of French filmmakers and critics didn't revive her film after her death in 1980.

Loden made the film as a sort of feminist anti-Bonnie and Clyde, but it was probably the way it was made (with a realist approach and intentional graininess) that probably appealed to its French fans.  Had Loden not later succumbed to cancer ten years later, there's a very good possibility that she would have enjoyed her revival and made more films.

Have a comment or question for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com and follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_73_Wanda_1970.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CDT

No Man's Land (2001) is the first film directed by Danis Tanovic, whose first exposure to filmmaking was as a documentarian during the conflict that broke apart Yugoslavia.  As much a commentary as it is a dark comedy, the film drips with Tanovic's sardonic view of the war he witnessed.

When a Serbian soldier and a Bosnian soldier find themselves trapped in a trench in the middle of the battlefield (the titular "no man's land"), they find themselves pawns in an agenda between the UN and the media that does not end well.  The film's promotional material marketed it as a commentary, but you won't be smiling when the credits roll at the end.

Have a question or comment for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_72_No_Mans_Land_2001.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CDT

Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall had already starred together in Howard Hawks' To Have and To Have Not (1944), but it was when Hawks reunited them in The Big Sleep (1946) that their onscreen chemistry really popped.

While the script is as confusing as Raymond Chandler's novel of the same name, Philip Marlowe is the epitome of the hard-boiled detective, an archetype that's been copied and parodied every since.  The real star of the film may be the witty dialogue between Bogart and Bacall, some of which went over the heads of those enforcing Hollywood's strict Production Code.

Have a question or comment for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_71_The_Big_Sleep_1946.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CDT

Jean-Jacques Beineix's Diva (1981) is the first film to be labelled as Cinema du Look, a subgenre of French films featuring intense love affairs, a cynical attitude towards the police, and much location shooting in Paris Metro.

Diva is the bizarre story of a young man who unwittingly finds himself in a manhunt by both the police and the Paris' criminal underworld.  On the margins, sometimes manipulating things, is a strange man and his girlfriend who have a fondness for minimal spaces and jigsaw puzzles.  With Beineix's unique direction, the film becomes quite an experience.

Have a question or comment for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC.

Direct download: Episode_70_Diva_1981.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CDT

Cave of Forgotten Dreams (1910) is a documentary made by legendary (and sometime controversial) filmmaker Werner Herzog, director of such films as Aguirre, The Wrath of God (1972) and Fitzcarraldo (1982).  Herzog was given limited access to the newly-discovered Chauvet Caves in Southern France before they were closed up only to be studied by scientists.

Herzog shot the film with 3-D technology, maneuvering delicate equipment around the caves with a crew of only three people.  What resulted is one of the most hypnotic pieces of documentary cinema, something that will make you wish you invested in a 3-D television.

Have a question or comment for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com, follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC, and look for the podcast's Facebook page.

Direct download: Episode_69_Cave_of_Forgotten_Dreams_2010.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am CDT

By the time 1983 rolled around, it seemed inevitable that someone would make a movie about the space race.  The Right Stuff (1983) is Philip Kaufman's practically exhaustive retelling of Tom Wolfe's book chronicles NASA's Mercury program, which trained the first seven astronauts how to travel in space.  Cast with a bunch of then unknowns (including Ed Harris, Dennis Quaid, and the recently departed Sam Shepard), the film was a hit with critics (despite a disappointing return at the box office) but remains something of a cult classic today.

Look out for appearances by Jeff Goldblum, Harry Shearer, Veronic Cartwright, and Chuck Yeager himself as a bartender, not to mention special effects and sound editing that could blow your socks off even in 2017.

Have a question or a comment for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com, follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC, or look for the podcast's Facebook page.

Direct download: Episode_68_The_Right_Stuff_1983.mp3
Category:1001 Movies -- posted at: 12:00am CDT

Before he was known for comic book fare like Superman Returns (2006) and X-Men: Apocalypse (2016), Bryan Singer directed a little something called The Usual Suspects (1995), which initially became an instant cult classic enjoyed mostly when it was released on home video but now stands out as one of the best dramas of its time, thanks primarily to an Academy Award-winning script by Christopher McQuarrie.

The Usual Suspects also cemented the career of Kevin Spacey, who also scored in the same year as the creepy killer in Se7en (1995).  Spacey won an Oscar as well.  The rest is in the history of cinema's most surprising plot twists.

Have a question or a comment for the host?  Email Sean at 1001moviespodcast@gmail.com, follow him on Twitter via @1001MoviesPC, or look for the podcast's Facebook page.

Direct download: Episode_67_The_Usual_Suspects_1995.mp3
Category:1001 Movies -- posted at: 12:00am CDT

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